Triathlon Training Log – Week 6 (Feb. 6)

After a fabulous long birthday weekend filled with sun, swimming, and family time, I am back in New York City.

Swimming in solitude

I did not want to come back north, and the Tri-state area greeted me a “snow storm” on Thursday.

General training notes: finally I kicked the cold that plagued me all last week and settled in to my normal training routine. Er, “normal” being relative since I was still in Sanibel during the beginning of the week. We altered the schedule a bit to include two rides on Thursday and Friday, and I was able to sneak in a run on Saturday morning before going to the Millrose Games.

Monday – a.m. swim

Outdoor swimming for the win—and I had a lane to myself for 95 percent of the workout. Earl assigned a main set that included 20×100, plus 16×50 with builds in increments of four (i.e. 1-4, 5-8, etc.)

Tuesday – a.m. swim

Final outdoor swim that included an endurance ladder—100, 200, 300, 400, then back down—and totaled 3,600m. I already miss swimming outside!

Wednesday – p.m. run

A late flight back to NYC on Tuesday night prompt me to push back my run to after work on Wednesday, and this move paid off. Not only was the weather perfect—hovering around 50 degrees Fahrenheit—but my legs also felt fresh. This was also my first true run “workout” of this training cycle, and I faced four, eight-minute blocks at half-marathon pace broken up by three minutes at marathon pace. I could tell my fitness from the water transferred to the road, and I could also tap into distinct efforts quite easily.

Thursday – a.m. CompuTrainer class at Tailwind Endurance

Tailwind took on the Tour of Sufferlandria, and we tackling a workout titled “There Is No Try.” The primary set included four main blocks, each of which increased in time spent at our sweet spot/threshold: 15 seconds on, 15 seconds off; 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off; 45 seconds on, 45 seconds off; one minute on, one minute off. There was a five-minute sweet spot block as well before we progressed back down this ladder, staring with the one-minute intervals.

Friday – a.m. CompuTrainer class at Tailwind Endurance

Why I/my coach thought back-to-back days of Sufferfest workouts would be a good idea is beyond me. This “Hell Hath No Fury” workout contained two, 20-minute blocks with effort levels fluctuating between 90 and 120 percent.  This was the hardest bike workout of the year, and I felt its effects throughout the weekend.

Saturday – a.m. run

Easy 6.5-mile shake out in Central Park.  My legs were still zapped from the Sufferfest session, but they felt much better once I finished.

Sunday – a.m. run

Shot legs and less-than-ideal weather equated to a tough “long run” for my buddy and me. It usually takes four or five miles for my legs to warm up, but because things didn’t improve once I hit the seven-mile mark, I pulled the plug. Thanks a lot, Sufferfest. Oh how I miss running on fresh legs.

How long does it take you to recover from tough workouts?

4 responses to “Triathlon Training Log – Week 6 (Feb. 6)

  1. Don’t we all miss running on fresh legs? LOL, sorry it didn’t go as well. There have been workouts it has taken me weeks to recover from…then some I feel good the next day. Weird.

    • GAWD, I miss fresh legs, lol. My running buddy and I were saying how much we miss the preseason days where all we’d do is swim and run.

  2. The toughest workouts, I would say it takes me up to a week to recover, but usually it takes a couple of days. When you’re still feeling the workout more than three days later, I definitely think the smart thing to do is pull the plug on additional tough workouts like long runs (which might not seem “tough” normally but definitely are rough on our bodies!).

    • Yeah, usually it takes me a week to feel totally recovered from a race, but I’ll be able to train through it while I’m 80-85 percent. My coach and I talked about my “failed” long run, and we agreed pulling the plug was the right call–I was back into normal training this week and had a great run yesterday!

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